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Let's Talk...Weather!

Welcome to the Environment Canada online community engagement site. For one month, we invited Canadians to join the discussion, learn about weather-related topics, and help us develop weather products and services that fit your needs

Commenting is now closed for this pilot project. You can still read all the comments, share and view photos, and access the documents and video. In the New Year, we will post a report here summarizing what we heard from Canadians. We appreciate your input, and it will be invaluable as we continue to develop products and services in the coming months and years.

Current conditions, public and marine weather forecasts, and public alerts are always available at our Weather page, www.weather.gc.ca .

You can always reach the Meteorological Service of Environment Canada through the Weather page at http://weather.gc.ca/mainmenu/contact_us_e.html .

Definitions, details, and further information about weather and meteorology topics can be found at: www.ec.gc.ca/meteo-weather .

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Let's talk weather!

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Discussion

Taking our consultations online: your feedback on “Let’s Talk Weather”

Comments 6

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

How do you want to connect with us?

This online discussion forum is one way Environment Canada can consult with you to get your feedback on various topics.

Did you find it easy to use? Please explain.

Would you participate on a platform like this in the future or recommend it to others?

 

by Lisa 9 Dec 2013, 5:31pm | 420 views

“Mind explaining?” Addressing impacts, context and recommendations in weather forecasts.

Comments 11

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

When preparing a weather forecast, Environment Canada could choose to include numbers that explain the strength of a weather element, a description of the resulting weather event, and/or a description of possible impacts as a result of the weather.

We would like to know which answers your needs.

Imagine today’s forecast predicts heavy rain. 

The weather forecast states “the rain could cause localized flooding, including extensive pooling on roadways and possible bridge washouts.”

What effect would a more detailed description of the weather and its impacts have on your activities?

Now imagine the weather forecast also added the following recommendation: “Never walk or drive through flood water – 15 cm of fast moving water can knock a person over and 60 cm can move a car.” 

Would you now react differently, knowing potential consequences of the forecast weather? Please explain.

Should forecasts include recommendations like this one? Please explain. 

by Lisa 2 Dec 2013, 3:43pm | 882 views

Timing of weather alerts: how much lead time do you need?

Comments 10

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

Environment Canada issues severe weather alerts within about 24 hours of the expected weather. Weather forecasters could issue alerts earlier than 24 hours ahead, but would have less confidence about the upcoming weather.

If you have plans for the coming weekend, and there is the potential for severe weather at that time, when would you like to be alerted to the potential for bad weather?

Would earlier alerts with less forecasting confidence be helpful in your decision-making?

by Lisa 9 Dec 2013, 5:30pm | 666 views

Making weather-related decisions when planning travel: what would you do?

Comments 7

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Environment Canada strives to help Canadians make better weather-related decisions. In order to do this, we would like to better understand how you use the weather forecast in your decision-making.

Imagine your cousin lives in a city 300 km away and you’ve not visited in a while. You call and make plans to go visit a few weeks from now.

Will you be checking the weather forecast in advance of your departure?  If you drive? If you fly? If you take the bus?

If so, how far ahead and how often?

How could the forecast affect your decisions or behaviours related to this trip? What weather information would make you change your plans?

by Lisa 2 Dec 2013, 3:51pm | 544 views

Making weather-related decisions when in charge of a youth group’s camping trip: what would you do?

Comments 4

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

Environment Canada strives to help Canadians improve their weather-related decisions. In order to do this, we would like to better understand how you use the weather forecast in your decision-making.

Imagine you are in charge of a youth group camping trip 10 days from now. Along with another organizer, you will be taking a group of 12 year-olds to camp in a provincial park one hour from the city. The group has been looking forward to this trip for months now! 

Will you be checking the weather forecast in advance of your departure?  When and how often? 

How could the forecast affect your decisions or behaviours related to this camping trip?

by Lisa 9 Dec 2013, 5:33pm | 324 views

“Oops, I should have taken the bus today…”

Comments 4

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

We all make daily decisions based on the weather. Some may be minor, like taking an umbrella, but others may be more serious, like driving on icy roads. These decisions might impact our activities at home, work or elsewhere.

For what kind of decisions do you most rely on weather information?

by Lisa 9 Dec 2013, 5:32pm | 376 views

“The weather presenter on TV said to watch out for falling trees!” Recommendations in weather alerts.

Comments 19

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Instead of simply presenting numerical values for forecasted elements, such as the wind, Environment Canada could add impact information and recommended actions to describe conditions. We would like to know if this would affect the way you make decisions.

Say that, instead of simply saying “the weather forecast predicts wind gusts up to 40 km/hour today and up to 90 km/hour tomorrow”, we added “consider securing garbage bins or other vulnerable items today. Tomorrow, also be careful of falling branches or power lines.”

Would this make a difference in how you prepare to deal with the wind today or tomorrow?

Should Environment Canada include these types of recommendations in forecasts and alerts?

by Vladimir 21 Nov 2013, 12:03pm | 942 views

Does this mean a breeze or a hurricane? Making sense of wind speeds.

Comments 23

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Environment Canada would like to better understand how Canadians react to different ways of presenting weather information.

Say the weather forecast predicts wind gusts up to 40 km/hour today and up to 90 km/hour tomorrow.

What does this tell you?

What, if anything, would you do to prepare for today?

What would you do to prepare for tomorrow?

by Vladimir 21 Nov 2013, 12:03pm | 1140 views

Making weather-related decisions when planning a picnic: what would you do?

Comments 10

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Environment Canada strives to help Canadians make better weather-related decisions. In order to do this, we would like to understand how you use the weather forecast in your decision-making.

Imagine it’s a Monday in June and you are in charge of planning a picnic on Saturday.

Will you check the weather forecast in advance of the picnic?

If so, when?

What impact could the forecast have on your decisions as the planner of this picnic?

What kind of weather information do you need to make weather-related decisions for upcoming activities or events like this?

by Vladimir 21 Nov 2013, 12:02pm | 668 views

Words and graphics: improving the visual presentation of weather forecasts.

Comments 37

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

In order to improve the presentation of its weather forecasts, Environment Canada is seeking to better understand the effects of words and graphics in communicating weather information.

Currently, Environment Canada weather forecasts on weather.gc.ca look like this example:

7 day forecast

When you look at a weather forecast like this one, what information do you look at first?

Do you tend to focus more on the words or the graphics (symbols) for your decision-making? Why?

How could we improve the way we visually present forecast information?

by Vladimir 21 Nov 2013, 12:02pm | 1541 views

Code red! Code green! Adding colour to weather alerts.

Comments 42

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Environment Canada is considering associating a colour level with its weather alerts to communicate to Canadians the potential impact of the weather.

For example, the colours below could be associated with an alert (e.g. a warning or advisory).

Sample color coding of weather alerts

Environment Canada hopes this could lead Canadians to make better decisions.

How would you react to an orange level alert versus a yellow level alert?

Would the addition of colour to Environment Canada’s weather alerts help you make more informed decisions? How?

by Vladimir 21 Nov 2013, 12:01pm | 2079 views

Help us improve!

Comments 82

This online discussion forum has concluded. You can still browse the site but the discussion area will no longer accept new comments or votes.

 

Environment Canada would like to hear your views about how we could improve our weather services and the way they are presented.

Is there any kind of weather-related information you wish you could access more easily?

How would you like to see this information presented? 

by Lisa 2 Dec 2013, 3:52pm | 2008 views

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